Types of Spaces

  • Explicit: Mentioned explicitly by name or allusion by the author.
  • Implicit: Not mentioned by name or allusion, but can be geolocated by the description of events or other markers.
  • Mentioned: A place that is mentioned, while the action takes place elsewhere.
  • Multiple points: Chains, networks, or multiple places that are connected or associated with one another.
  • Origins: Adjectives—demonyms and ethnonyms, for example—with embedded geographic data.

Annotating Simple and Embedded Geographic Information

  • Named places
    Madrid, El barranco de Embajadores
  • Unnamed, but identifiable places
    Una plaza grande—>La Plaza Mayor
  • Unnamed, unidentifiable, but geolocatable
    
La freiduría de la Glorieta de Atocha
  • Demonyms and ethnonyms

    Madrileña, mideluéstica, esquimal, hotentotes
  • The origin of people, groups, objects, or metaliterary references
    
El cómite Premio Nobel (Sweden), Eugenia Grandet (France), Neslé (Switzerland), El Kama-sutra (India)

Other Spatial and Geographic Data

  • Motion-oriented verbs, nouns, adjectives: 
Subir, huir, caminar, llegada, viandantes, hundido, descendente
  • Adverbs pertaining to position or displacement: 
hacia, desde, hasta, fuera de
  • Geographic words: Cuesta, cerro, cornisa, río, sierra
  • 

“Weird” and liminal spaces (heterotopias):
 Mirrors, cars, trains, the metro, roads, cemeteries, tombs, borders, museums, street festivals, etc. Motion-oriented verbs, nouns, adjectives: 
Subir, huir, caminar, llegada, viandantes, hundido, descendente
  • Adverbs pertaining to position or displacement: 
hacia, desde, hasta, fuera de

Finding Patterns and Points of Convergence/Divergence

Reading this way—even before analyzing the text digitally—reveals patterns. For example:

  • The importance of the origin of people, objects, ideas, and literary works. A side effect of the suffocating postwar environment and its imposed silence.
  • Parallelisms and overlapping. Every place is simultaneously another place. Every person has a literary/historic doppelganger with its own geographic baggage.
  • The mapped city versus the unmapped peripheral “edgelands.”

Presentations: